EARTH DYNAMICS

P1. Tectonics and sedimentation
P2. Evolution of sedimentary basins: an integrated approach
P3. Disclosing the subduction factory
P4. Exhumation processes
P5. Dynamics of the oceanic lithosphere
P6. Adria Plate
P7. Coupling deep mantle structures with surface processes and magmatism along the Tethyian margin
P8. Dynamics of the Earth interior

NATURAL RESOURCES

P9. Transition to renewable energy
P10. Geo-Energy and Hazards
P11. Hydrogeological environments: challenges and advances
P12. Marine resources and hydrothermalism

GEO HAZARDS

P13. Earthquakes and tsunami
P14. Volcanic Hazard in the terrestrial and marine environment
P15. Landslides in the terrestrial and marine environment
P16. Floods
P17. Geo-pollutants
P18. Coastal erosion

GEOSPHERE and BIOSPHERE

P19. Extreme environments
P20. Carbonate rocks: from sedimentation to diagenesis
P21. Geology and ecosystems

PALEO-CLIMATE AND PALEO- ENVIROMENT

P22. Paleo-climatic transitions
P23. Resilience of oceanic ecosystems preserved in the geological record
P24. Holocene climate
P25. Quaternary eustatic sea level change

PLANETARY GEOLOGY

P26. The cosmic challenge: from interplanetary dust to the bricks of life
P27. The contribution of geology to the knowledge of solar system bodies

ANTROPOSPHERE

P28. Urban Geology and Geomorphology
P29. Geoarcheology

GEOLOGICAL HERITAGE

P30. Geo-heritage, geoparks, geo-itineraries
P31. Geology, food and health

EXPERIMENTAL GEOLOGY AND PETROLOGY

P32. Geo-data science
P33. Petrological and numerical tools to unravel the dynamics of Earth’s interior

GEOSCIENCE FOR TEACHERS AND STUDENTS

P34. Geosciences at School 2021

OPEN SESSIONS

P35. Open Poster Session


P1. Tectonics and sedimentation
Conveners: Giovanni Barreca [University of Catania], David Iacopini [University of Naples - Federico II], Stefano Zanchetta [University of Milano - Bicocca], Francesca Cifelli [University of Roma - Roma Tre]
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We welcome contributions that deal with tools and methods useful to understand how sedimentary processes are influenced by tectonic and vice-versa. We encourage studies which use traditional and/or modern investigation techniques (e.g. classical field surveys and/or digital mapping or geophysical data), aimed to better understand the interactions and couplings between these processes and their control on sedimentation and deformation rates in sedimentary basins and mountains belts. Further, cross-disciplinary works (e.g. structural-stratigraphic-geophysical investigations), concerning subsurface setting on both continental and marine environments are appreciated together with contributions aimed to quantify rates of surface processes and landscape evolution that take advantage from numerical/physical modelling or geochemical tools (cosmogenic nuclides, low-temperature thermochronology, luminescence dating, etc.) or high-resolution digital topographic and subsurface data. We also encourage field and subsurface studies dealing with 3D-modeling of stratigraphic and structural data.


P2. Evolution of sedimentary basins: an integrated approach
Conveners: Valentina Rossi [CNR – IGG], Gianluca Frijia [University of Ferrara], Marcello Tropeano [University of Bari],  Salvatore Critelli [University of Calabria]
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Sediments are routed across landscapes from source areas to sedimentary basins or, as carbonates, they are “born in situ”, where they build stratigraphy and form archives of Earth’s history. Understanding the interplay between tectonics, climate, erosion rates, sediment transport and deposition, as well as paleoenvironmental and geochemical effects on biota, at a range of temporal and spatial scales is pivotal to reconstruct basin evolution. Furthermore, anthropic pressure is also increasingly affecting natural processes in all areas of sedimentary basins, from source areas to the coastlines.  Therefore, it becomes crucial to be able to predict and mitigate future changes on the ecosystems and human populations, and to ensure a sustainable exploitation of georesources. To that end, a deep understanding of all components of sedimentary basins from facies analyses to paleogeographic and paleotectonic reconstructions is needed. In this session, we invite interdisciplinary researchers working on all aspects of basin analysis (from source to sink) across different temporal and spatial scales and on a variety of depositional processes and systems (clastic, carbonates, mixed). We welcome field, subsurface, experimental and modelling studies, as well as sedimentological, geochemical, structural, geochronological, provenance and marine geology investigations. Contributions based on IODP and ICDP scientific results are also welcomed. Submissions from early career researchers and students are particularly encouraged.


P3. Disclosing the subduction factory
Conveners: Francesca Meneghini [University of Pisa], Martina Casalini [University of Firenze], Michele Zucali [University of Milano – Statale], Francesca Remitti [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia]
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The subduction zones are commonly described as subduction factories where various scale processes transform and recycle raw input materials from different sources, along ever-increasing P-T-strain paths down to the mantle, and return them back to the surface, through structural, geochemical and petrological transformations. Sediments, continental and oceanic lithosphere, fluids, asthenospheric mantle, along with all the related inherited structures and structural anisotropies, can be considered as input material. The outputs are all the products directly released after subduction started, but also all those remaining as witness of such process. But the subduction factory also produces trash that is recycled within the mantle, atmosphere or spread out everywhere. In this session we want to investigate the processes that operate in present and past subduction zones, inviting all researches, from all fields, involved in: the characterization of input and output materials in modern or ancient margins, and how these materials circulate in the system; the reconstruction or modeling of active and past processes – wit the goal to stimulate a discussion aimed at bridging the gap between disciplines.


P4. Exhumation processes
Conveners: Roberto Visalli [University of Catania],  Manuel Roda [University of Milano - Statale], Marco Malusa' [University of Milano - Bicocca], Nadia Malaspina [University of Milano - Bicocca]
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Exhumation of deep-seated rocks allows direct observation of deformation and metamorphism experienced by these rocks at different structural levels, thus improving our understanding of geologic processes driving rock exhumation and controlling exhumation rates along plate margins. Recent advances in diffusion chronometry, thermochronology, paleopiezometry, geochronology, forward thermodynamic and geodynamic modelling open up new perspectives on how rocks evolve in time and space, providing tools to understand the geodynamics at plate margins and the evolution of orogenic systems. This session encourages contributions from scientists with different backgrounds in tectonics, thermochronology and geochronology, structural geology, numerical modeling, and petrology, with particular emphasis on new and developing tools to constraint exhumation processes and associated exhumation rates.


P5. Dynamics of the oceanic lithosphere
Conveners: Marco Ligi [CNR - ISMAR], Paola Tartarotti [University of Milano - Statale], Laura Crispini [University of Genoa], Alessio Sanfilippo [University of Pavia]
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The oceanic lithosphere, the rigid plate covering 70% of the Earth's surface, controls a broad range of surface and deep Earth processes, including heat flow and energy transfer at small and large scales. Lithosphere formation is controlled by melting processes at the ridge axis. To first order the evolution of the oceanic lithosphere is governed by thermal evolution as the seafloor migrates away from the ridge. With age, the region beneath the depleted layer cools and accretes into its base, thickening the lithosphere. In this session we focus on lithosphere evolution from its infancy at spreading centers to old seafloor at the perimeter of oceanic basins. Oceanic mantle and crustal rocks record a complex tectono-magmatic evolution, including melt extraction, mantle-melt reaction, crustal production, interaction with fluids and deformation. Data from structural analysis, petrology, geochemistry, geophysics, numerical modeling, in situ oceanic lithosphere by deep ocean drilling and ophiolites provide constraints on the evolution of oceanic lithosphere. We encourage contributions from a broad range of disciplines that constrain the evolution of oceanic mantle and crust, in particular focusing on implications for construction and alteration of oceanic lithosphere during continental rupturing, at mid-ocean ridges, back arc basins, and subduction zones.


P6. Adria Plate
Conveners: Vanja Kastelic [INGV], Enrico Serpelloni [INGV], Chiara Amadori [University of Pavia], Igor Vlahovic [University of Zagreb], Josip Stipcevic [University of Zagreb]
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The Adriatic microplate (Adria), before the late Triassic–early Jurassic part of the African tectonic plate, has since been characterized by a continuous motion towards NE with respect to a fixed Europe, evolving from a passive margin to a foreland-to-foredeep setting in its more distal areas. In the current geodynamic setting it is in contact with several tectonic domains, with the External Dinarides (ED) having developed along its NE, E and SE margin. The ED, an active, generally SW-verging thrust-and-fold-belt, release the majority of the Adria E margin convergent deformation, while a minor deformation part is transferred to more internal regions and the Adria itself through a progressive outward growth of the ED thrust belt. On the other hand, Adria influences the active processes at its margins and interior through pre-existing structures, influencing the tectono-sedimentary processes and earthquake activity. The active tectonic boundaries of Adria are well-outlined by seismicity, including M>6 earthquakes, while its internal deformation remains less understood. We seek contributions from international scientific community with sedimentology, stratigraphy, structural geology, tectonics, seismology, geophysics and geodetic background with the aim of improving our knowledge of the Adria (and the ED) geodynamics and active tectonics.


P7. Coupling deep mantle structures with surface processes and magmatism along the Tethyian margin
Conveners: Paolo Ballato [University of Roma - Roma Tre], Paola Molin [University of Roma - Roma Tre], Barbara Orecchio [University of Messina], Pietro Sternai [University of Milano - Bicocca]
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The study of Cenozoic deformation, magmatism and uplift history along the Tethyan margin represents an opportunity to understand the geodynamic control on the evolution of the continental lithosphere at convergent margins. Indeed, the Tethyan margin represents a natural laboratory that allows investigating structural, stratigraphic, magmatic, geochemical, geophysical and geomorphic signals, and exploring the rich interaction between deep seated and surface processes. This includes feedbacks and causative relationships at different spatial and temporal scales. Although, the Tethyan margin has been investigated in detail for many decades, first order questions related to the mechanisms that control the coupling between surface and deep Earth processes and the characteristic timescales and magnitudes of the feedbacks involved remain unsolved. Here, we invite contributions from different Earth Science disciplines that address these and other related questions, allowing to progress in this research building upon the continuously growing body of observational constraints.


P8. Dynamics of the Earth interior
Conveners: Marco Cuffaro  [CNR – IGAG], Magdala Tesauro [University of Trieste], Valentina Magni [University of Oslo]
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The study of the dynamics of the Earth’s interior is crucial to understand the geodynamic processes responsible for the deep mantle structures and surface topography. Interactions between mantle and lithosphere contribute on the Earth’s surface changes, which lead to mountain building, oceanic and continental basin formation, seismicity and volcanism both at plate boundaries and in the inner stable plate. Composition and dynamics of the Earth’s interior is studied using direct and indirect methodologies (e.g., oceanic and continental drilling, seismology, gravity, magnetotellurics, and mineral physics) and collecting different kinds of data (e.g., well-log data, xenoliths, and geophysical data). Furthermore, numerical and analogue models are essential tools to describe the Earth processes and plate tectonics in terms of physics-based equations and represent scaled reproductions of the geological bodies in terms of material properties, respectively.  This session aims to provide a multidisciplinary view on the processes and structures of the Earth. We welcome contributions from a wide range of disciplines (geodynamics, geology, seismology, gravity, mineral physics, geochemistry, petrology, and volcanology) that address the structure, dynamics, composition, and evolution of the Earth, on temporal scales ranging from the present day to the geological past.


P9. Transition to renewable energy
Conveners: Sabina Bigi [University of Roma La Sapienza], Nina Rman [Geological Survey of Slovenia], Eugenio Trumpy [CNR – IGG Pisa], Valentina Volpi [OGS]
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The world is undergoing a radical transformation in the way energy is produced and used, shifting to a cleaner, and more efficient energy system, where industry, research organizations are working together to speed up this transformation and to facilitate the achievement of the ambitious climate and energy targets through the decarbonisation of the energy sector. EU has the ambition to excel in renewable energy, fostering R&I activity for the development of the next generation of renewable energy technologies. All the renewable energy resources and energy storage, however, are related to the Earth subsurface (heat, water) and its atmosphere (wind, solar). The use of geothermal energy, CO2 geological storage technologies and other renewables can guarantee the effective reduction of greenhouse gas emission to zero and even to a negative emission balance. This session aims to be a platform for geoscientists who play and important role in most of these fields in providing reliable subsurface information for a sustainable and safe environmental impact. We seek for contributions from all disciplines, ranging from field data acquirements and analysis to laboratory experiments, e.g. geophysical surveys or geochemical experiments, and from the management and organization of information to numerical models as well as from (hydro)geologists, geochemists, (geo)physicists, surface and subsurface engineers to stimulate discussion in all the technological, multi-disciplinary applied research fields.


P10. Geo-Energy and Hazards
Conveners: Letizia Anderlini [INGV], Mariangela Guidarelli [OGS], Luca Martelli [Regione Emilia-Romagna]
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The use and sustainable development of subsoil energy resources requires a deeper knowledge of the impacts of production activities on territory and communities. The session is intended to be an interdisciplinary opportunity to broaden the audience and improve knowledge on subsurface energy resources research and extraction activities and on possible environmental and geological hazards, in order to increase the safety and resilience of communities. Contributions about the possible approaches to the topic are expected from scientific researchers, exploration and production Companies and land management Authorities:
1) methods of characterization of the subsoil and its dynamics,
2) limits and potentials of current monitoring techniques, and feasible improvements and integrations,
3) assessment of potential risks related to human activities and local hazard conditions,
4) structural and non-structural activities for prevention and mitigation of potential impacts,
5) communication and correct information.


P11. Hydrogeological environments: challenges and advances
Conveners: Luca Zini [University of Trieste], Manuela Lasagna [University of Torino], Franci Gabrovsek [Research Karst Institute Postojna]
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The studies related to porous, fissured and karst aquifers are not only focused to the study of the water resources and to the realization of hydrogeological models, but also to a better understanding of the future availability of the resources in terms of quality and quantity. The sustainable management of groundwater is still challenging due to the increasing over-exploitation, the sea-water intrusion, and the pollution events, with the consequent deterioration of water quality. Moreover, analysis of flow and transport in aquifers must consider strong local heterogeneities in the hydraulic parameter field and typically sparse and uncertain field data for system characterization. The session welcomes contributions covering all aspects of the hydrogeology of porous, fissured and/or karstified aquifers as well as geomorphological studies aimed at better understanding the hydrogeological environment. Contributions related to the methods for assessing the vulnerability of the aquifers are also welcome. We also encourage contributions related to new approaches for sustainable management of groundwater resources and the analysis of the consequences due to climate change.

Sessione patrocinata dalla IAH-Italian Chapter


P12. Marine resources and hydrothermalism
Conveners: Chiara Boschi [CNR - IGG], Marzia Rovere [CNR - ISMAR], Riccardo Tribuzio [University of Pavia]
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In the last decade new research topics have emerged regarding past and active hydrothermal systems and mineral resources. Addressing links between tectonic complexities and magmatic-hydrothermal processes (e.g. serpentinization, carbonation, etc.), characterizing hydrothermal contributions to global ocean budgets (e.g. heat, carbon, iron), biogeochemical cycle of the elements and associated ecosystem functions, stability and resilience in a wider deep-sea context have inspired a growing number of studies. In addition, rising demand for minerals and metals, particularly in the information and green technology sectors, has led to a resurgence of interest in exploration of mineral resources located on the seabed, both at shallow locations and at the deepest abyssal plains and/or associated to hydrothermal vents.


P13. Earthquakes and tsunami
Conveners: Fabrizio Romano [INGV], Luisa Valoroso [INGV], Barbara Lolli [INGV], Federica Ferrarini [University of Chieti-Pescara], Susi Pepe [CNR - IREA], Andrea Magrin [OGS]
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Earthquakes, and the related tsunamis, are one of the most damaging manifestations of the motion of tectonic plates deforming the Earth's crust. Mitigation of the seismic and tsunami risk for human populations and cultures relies upon our ability to correctly understand the level of hazard characterizing a region. Hence, a correct evaluation of the seismic and tsunami hazard requires the knowledge of the geometry of active faults, the physical conditions and the processes underlying seismo- and tsunamigenesis. In the last 20 years, a large amount of geophysical data has been collected during moderate-to-large earthquakes and tsunamis. This data together with results from laboratory experiments, analysis of paleoseismological data and historical records, geological field mapping and structural analysis of faults, as well as ocean and continental scientific drilling have shown the importance of the multidisciplinary approach to study the complexity of the seismic rupture propagation, and their link with the tsunamigenesis. In this session, we invite multidisciplinary contributions at the frontiers between Geology, Seismology, Geodesy, Rock Mechanics, Tectonics and their applications, to foster a comprehensive understanding of the faulting processes and of the key parameters controlling the physics of earthquakes and tsunamis, with a particular focus on the Euro-Mediterranean area. Studies based on ocean and continental scientific drilling are also welcomed.


P14. Volcanic Hazard in the terrestrial and marine environment
Conveners: Francesca Bianco [INGV], Giorgio Lacanna [University of Firenze], Marco Viccaro [University of Catania]
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Volcanoes can be source of the most important natural hazards on Earth. Accurate hazard estimation is therefore crucial for improving the mitigation of potential risks coming from volcanic activity. Hazards can derive from a wide range of eruptive activity, which means they are able to cause several types of impacts, such as: i) pyroclastic density currents; ii) lava flow invasion; iii) ash fallout and dispersal in the atmosphere; (iv) flank eruptions; v) paroxysmal explosions, etc. In marine environments (i.e., volcanic islands or submarine volcanoes), some of these activities can also generate violent hydro-magmatic explosions or large mass failures with triggering of tsunamis and severe impacts also at great distances from the source of the event. In this regard, recent unrest at many submarine volcanoes raises serious concerns regarding the level of risk posed to local communities. Moreover, the hazard in highly urbanized volcanic areas represents an important opportunity for sharing volcanological knowledge and dealing with hazard assessment and mitigation. In this session, we ask for contributions that cover the different aspects of volcanic hazard, i.e., eruption chronology and description, analysis of tephra deposits, petrological studies, analysis of geophysical and geochemical data coming from monitoring networks, tsunami dynamics, and flank instability in estimating the volcanic processes and their impacts in terrestrial and marine environments.

Sessione patrocinata da AIV


P15. Landslides in the terrestrial and marine environment
Conveners: Chiara Calligaris [University of Trieste], Maria Teresa Brunetti [CNR – IRPI], Daniele Casalbore [University of Roma - La Sapienza], Mariacristina Prampolini [CNR – ISMAR]
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Landslides are natural or even human-induced geo-hazards occurring typically in hilly and mountainous regions but also in subaqueous environments. All over the world, they pose serious challenges for the safety of the population, causing fatalities and economic losses. Over the past decades, efforts have been made to consolidate landslide and debris flows risk management, enhancing techniques and pioneering applications in order to keep these areas safer. However, as extreme rainfall events occur with increasing frequency due to climate change, the threat posed by compound geohazards will inevitably increase. Similarly, subaqueous and coastal landslides widespread occur in lakes, fjords and oceans of the world, representing one of the most significant marine geohazard, because they can directly impact coastal and offshore infrastructures as well as cause local but destructive tsunamis, as recently testified by several historical case-studies (e.g., Nice, 1979 and Stromboli 2002).
The proposed session focuses on disaster risk analysis and management, which comprehends geomorphological investigations, field experiences, seafloor sampling and drilling, remote sensing (even in underwater environments) analyses as well as numerical simulations aiming at managing for hazard identification and effective disaster risk reduction. The session will provide an overview of the progresses and new scientific approaches also of the Earth Observation (EO) applications for investigating landslides. The session welcomes contributions covering all aspects of landslides investigation and management such as new methods for data collection and processing, geomorphometric investigations, numerical simulation of geohazards at local and global scale, innovative applications on remote sensing data for hazard, vulnerability and risk mapping.


P16. Floods
Conveners: Giacomo Pepe [University of Genova], Corrado Cencetti [University of Perugia], Nicola Surian [University of Padova]
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Floods represent one of the most important and frequent geo-hazards. Although significant progress has been made, the study of floods (e.g. prediction and mapping) continues to be a major challenge for scientists and practitioners. The purpose of this session is to gather contributions that highlight the role of geological and geomorphological aspects in understanding, modelling and predicting floods and related hazard. It provides a platform for interdisciplinary approaches and case studies addressing the analysis of floods at different spatial scales, using both classical and innovative methodologies (e.g. remote sensing techniques), which may be useful for researchers, stakeholders and decision makers involved in flood risk mitigation and management.
Although we expect that contributions will give a broad view about floods, we encourage contributions on the following topics:
- Extreme floods
- Floods related to specific geological processes (e.g. landslide dams)
- The role of geomorphic processes (i.e. channel lateral mobility, intense sediment and wood transport) during floods
- Channel adjustments (e.g. channel incision and narrowing) and their implications for flood modelling and mapping.


P17. Geo-pollutants
Conveners: Barbara Nisi [CNR – IGG], Jacopo Cabassi [CNR - IGG], Alessandro Acquavita [ARPA FVG]
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We can imagine our planet as a big, finite and vulnerable container,  being filled by natural processes and anthropic activities  with inorganic and organic geo-pollutants that are able to seriously affect and damage the Anthroposphere and, consequently, the geological matrices l.s., i.e. land, water and air. Solid geo-pollutants may be contained/hosted/stored in a specific site, whereas when present in liquid and gaseous forms may migrate through several pathways, e.g. pores in, and boundaries between, materials, until reaching places where further migration is inhibited. This session is aimed at bringing together multidisciplinary studies dealing with: i) geo-pollutants origin, fate and transport in aquatic, terrestrial and atmospheric environments; ii) chemical and physical processes regulating pollutants distribution; iii) innovative sampling and analytical protocols to recognize and quantify the contribution operated by different pollutant sources; iv) risk assessment and mitigation of contaminated sites; v) management of environmental quality. Specific investigations on geo-pollutants originated in relation with ocean and continental scientific drilling projects and the effects produced by water and drilling waste are also welcome.

Sessione patrocinata da SOGEI


P18. Coastal erosion
Conveners: Clara Armaroli [Istituto Universitario di Studi Superiori (IUSS)], Renata Archetti [University of Bologna], Duccio Bertoni [University of Pisa], Simone Simeone [CNR – IAS]
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Coastal areas are threatened by different hazards that include the overexploitation of marine resources, human pressure, coastal erosion and flooding, among many others. Coastal erosion is one of the major threats affecting low-lying shorelines. Anthropogenic and natural factors can either promote coastal erosion or increase its rate. Intensity and frequency of storms can affect sandy shores and coastal barriers and promote mobilization of sediments on a short-term time scale. Globally, many coastal areas experience chronic erosion due to reduced sediment supply to the littoral zone (reduced river input, construction of structures that interrupt the alongshore sediment transport, degradation of dune systems and ecosystems). The assessment of risk due to erosion plays an important role in managing the coast and constitutes the first step in defining the most suitable strategies to guarantee the protection of a vulnerable territory. In light of climate change, a greater understanding of the hydro-morphodynamic processes of the coast is crucial for risk mitigation. This session aims at collecting contributions of Italian and international experiences for the study of hydro-morphodynamic processes for the evaluation of coastal erosion and protection/mitigation interventions, using ground-based monitoring, remote sensing monitoring, field experimental tests, observations, analysis and modelling through multidisciplinary and/or integrated approaches.


P19. Extreme environments
Conveners: Giuliana Panieri [CAGE – Tromsø], Patrizia Fumagalli [University of Milano – Statale], Marcello Natalicchio [University of Torino]
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Extreme environments are common on the Earth surface and poorly accessible subsurface where life is severely challenged by numerous environmental stresses, including the presence of unusual and toxic chemicals, the absence of oxygen, high or low temperature and pressure, high salt concentrations, or a combination of them. Decipher these physico-chemical parameters today is important in reconstructing the geological record and investigate the ability of organisms to thrive under extreme conditions. This session aims at illustrating case studies and the most recent advances in the investigation of extreme environments in the present-day environments and in the geological past. We aim at gathering scientists from the fields of geology, petrology, (micro)biology and ecology, geochemistry, and modelling to discuss examples from volcanic, evaporitic, hydrothermal and hydrocarbon seep, and planetary analogs.


P20. Carbonate rocks: from sedimentation to diagenesis
Conveners: Alessandro Iannace [University of Napoli - Federico II], Giovanna Della Porta [University of Milano – Statale], Carlo Bertok  [University of Torino]
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Carbonate sediments and rocks record a wide spectrum of superimposed sedimentary and diagenetic processes from the time of deposition to burial. Carbonate mineral precipitation in marine and continental settings results from the interaction of physico-chemical, biogenic and environmental factors largely modified by early to late diagenetic fluids. Unravelling the complexity of such processes and products requires a multi-disciplinary approach ranging from facies analysis, petrographic, geochemical, and geochronological investigations. This session welcomes all contributions dealing with carbonate sedimentary successions, their environments of deposition and diagenetic modifications, and the application of novel methodologies to improve our knowledge and understanding of sedimentary, biological and diagenetic processes influencing carbonate rock successions.


P21. Geology and ecosystems
Conveners: Giuliana Villa [University of Parma], Alessandra Savini [University of Milano – Bicocca], Stefano Covelli [University of Trieste]
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This session covers a broad spectrum of research dealing with the specific interactions between the lithosphere and biosphere from different perspectives, through an integrated concept of the role of the geological and climatic changes in the evolution of the biosphere. In the last decades, the interest on the geoenvironmental evolution of ecosystems along with its prediction due to geological and  tectonic processes, climate change and mineral resources extraction (groundwaters, minerals, oil) has significantly increased. In the last fifty years researches originated by means of  ocean and continental scientific drilling have represented a fundamental advance in the reconstruction of tectonics, biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy. Biogeochemical processes in natural Earth systems, and anthropogenic impacts on them, are investigated through geochemical and isotopic tracers for a variety of chemical constituents.
We encourage contributions from interdisciplinary researches, with a scientific approach addressed to the reconstruction of past environment and to the monitoring of the evolving environment under different natural conditions.


P22. Paleo-climatic transitions
Conveners: Carlo Baroni [University of Pisa], Florence Colleoni [OGS], Fabio Florindo [INGV], Fabrizio Frontalini [University of Urbino]
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Earth’s current climate is on the edge of a new global transition, perhaps one of the fastest of its history. Geological evidence has revealed that many climatic transitions occurred in the deep past and also more recently during the last glacial cycle. Past warm and cold climatic transitions since the Phanerozoic had timescales ranging from millions of years when the cause was mostly tectonic, to few centuries to few millennia if mostly triggered by internal feedbacks of the climate system. Mechanisms causing those transitions are not all well constrained, and many components of the Earth’s climate system have tipping behaviours leading to long-term changes of global climate when crossing a given threshold. On large timescales, tectonics sets the framework for atmospheric and oceanic circulation, which, all together modulate the carbon cycle and determine heat transport from low to high latitudes. Uncertainties linked with tipping behaviour of the climatic components under different past conditions (different gateways, different mountain ranges, different carbon cycle) are still large. Constraining better rates and amplitudes of triggered mechanisms to past warm and cold climatic transitions may help understanding the tipping behaviour of the current climate system. This session invites contributions with, but not only, multidisciplinary approach, regional to global, with observational or modelling approach, to provide an overview of the state of knowledge about mechanisms of past climatic transitions and tipping points.

Sessione patrocinata dalla SPI


P23. Resilience of oceanic ecosystems preserved in the geological record
Conveners: Giulia Faucher  [Università Statale di Milano], Mariano Parente [Università di Napoli Federico II], Marco Romano [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, “Sapienza” Università di Roma]
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Life on Earth has survived major paleoenvironmental disturbances, generally forced by rapid climatic change causing profound stresses on both marine and terrestrial ecosystems.  The fossil record of these events of paleoenvironmental disturbance reveals pattern of variable ecosystem resilience. The causes of past climate change were geological in origin and often related to periods of intense volcanic activity driving a rapid rise in atmCO2. Under the present rate of increase, largely driven by anthropogenic causes, atmCO2 may reach 600 parts per million (ppm) by the end of this century, a value that has not been experienced in the past 24 million years. Although research findings have started to point out how profoundly the rising of atmospheric CO2 would affect the marine and terrestrial ecosystems, laboratory and in situ studies should be integrated with the huge archive available in the geologic record to help formulating more realistic predictions. In fact, we are living through a unique experiment of earth system perturbation, but our planet has already experienced similar – or even more extreme – conditions and the geological record can be used to figure out what we have to face in the near future.
This session aims at bringing together contributions investigating the functioning of terrestrial and marine (pelagic and shallow-water) ecosystems under stressed conditions in the Phanerozoic. The comparison of the different study intervals will point out if patterns of crisis and resilience are repetitive or specific to individual episodes of paleoenvironmental disturbance, providing potential means of validations of future predictions.

Sessione patrocinata dalla SPI


P24. Holocene climate
Conveners: Eleonora Regattieri [CNR IGG], Fabrizio Lirer [CNR ISMAR], Leonardo Tamborrino [MARUM]
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The Holocene, formally subdivided (June 2018) in three stages (Greenlandian, Northgrippian and Meghalayan), is an epoch for which a wide range of climatic, biotic, geomorphological and archaeological evidences show the occurrence of important, possibly abrupt, climate oscillations (e.g., Little Ice Age, Medieval Optimum, 4.2 or 8.2 events).
These past changes represent important time windows to study the effect of temperature and precipitation variability on terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and offer the unique opportunity to disentangle the relationship between the natural climate and environmental change and the development of ancient human societies. However, the increasing number of past climate reconstructions, also integrating data from different paleoarchives, often depicts contrasting past scenarios, suggesting that the spatial and temporal patterns of Holocene climate variability and the role of the different external forcing and internal feedbacks are not yet fully understood.
The Holocene is probably the most intensively studied epoch within the geological time scale. In this session, we invite contribution regarding paleoclimate reconstruction from different archives (marine and lacustrine sediment cores, ice cores, peat bogs, speleothems, tree rings, corals) that used a mosaic of different proxies to better assess the different aspects of the long- and short-term Holocene climate evolution, as well as the related environmental responses and the potential links between climate and human activities and impacts.

Sessione patrocinata da AIQUA


P25. Quaternary climate and sea level change
Conveners: Matteo Vacchi [University of Pisa], Gaia Mattei [University of Naples - Parthenope], Vincenzo Pascucci [University of Sassari]
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Climate and sea level changes are some of the main topics with which humans will have to deal in the next decades. Investigating how the climate changed in the past is one of the keys to produce possible future scenarios in the short/medium term and to define how much the human impact has and is affecting these changes.
The coastal and adjacent areas are those most affected by climate changes and are those in which small changes eustatic, isostatic and/or anthropogenic triggered significant environmental modifications.
This session welcomes contributions presenting recent the advancements in the definition of drivers and magnitude of Quaternary sea-level changes at both global and regional scale.  We invite submissions reporting sea-level reconstructions using a variety of proxies (e.g., sedimentary, geomorphic, archaeological etc.) and sea-level/climate forecast of the close by future. In particular, this session welcomes presentations covering all aspects of observation, paleoclimate reconstruction and innovative modeling tools which can help to reduce the uncertainty in the projections of future global sea level rise.

Sessione patrocinata da AIQUA


P26. The cosmic challenge: from interplanetary dust to the bricks of life
Conveners: Cristian Carli  [INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali], Lidia Pittarello  [Natural History Museum Vienna]
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The studies on extraterrestrial material of the last decades – mostly focused on cosmochemical and petrological analyses of meteorites, micrometeorites, lunar samples and interplanetary dust particles - provided important results for the science. In addition, the ongoing sample return space missions and the researches on exoplanets will provide more information in future, contributing to improve our understanding of the formation and evolution of the Solar System and of the processes related to the origin of life. These advancements of our knowledge based on a multidisciplinary approach help planning and improving future sample analyses and space missions. Contributes from all fields of planetary sciences, from mineralogy to astrobiology, from petrology to cosmochemistry are welcome.


P27. The contribution of geology to the knowledge of solar system bodies
Conveners: Alice Lucchetti [INAF – OAPD, Astronomical Observatory of Padova], Valentina Galluzzi [INAF-IAPS - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Roma]
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Our grasp on the early formation, history, and evolution of planet Earth strongly depends on the knowledge of our Solar System. Processes such as volcanism, tectonics, impact cratering, surface evolution, and interior mechanics are fundamental to the formation and evolution of the planets, moons, asteroids, and comets from both a geological and geophysical point of view. These processes have largely contributed to shaping planetary surfaces in different ways, and at different rates. Impacts have played a critical role during planetary history, by delivering the primary constituents of asteroids and planets and by peppering their surface with impact craters. Volcanic and tectonic processes are efficient mechanisms to resurface terrestrial planets and bring valuable information on planetary interior structure and evolution. Extreme conditions on the outer Solar System bodies, such as the Jovian and Saturnian satellites, result in different types of exogenic and endogenic features, from cryovolcanism and ice-tectonics to subsurface oceans. This session welcomes all methods of investigation of planetary endogenic and exogenic processes acting on the Solar System bodies.


P28. Urban Geology and Geomorphology
Conveners: Laura Melelli [University of Perugia], Pierluigi Brandolini [University of Genova], Diego Di Martire [University of Napoli], Domenico Calcaterra [University of Napoli]
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The rate of urbanization is constantly increasing worldwide. The role of the Earth Sciences in urban areas is becoming progressively important, both for the acquisition of new knowledge and as an element of connection with other disciplines that contribute to urban planning. With these premises, the session aims to collect oral and poster contributions as multidiciplinary as possible.
The session topics are:
- geological and palaeogeographic arrangement evolution (in space and time) in cities,
- geological risks evaluation and mitigation in urban areas,
- geological resources in urban areas,
- geological and geomorphological mapping for cities with a focus on the role of anthropogenic landforms and deposits,
- cities as test areas for evaluating the anthropic impact on the natural processes dynamic due to climate change, cities for the development of the geoheritage and geotourism.


P29. Geoarcheology
Conveners: Emanuele Forte [University of Trieste], Federico Bernardini [ICTP – Trieste], Sossio Fabio Graziano [University of Napoli]
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Geoarchaeology aims to deepen knowledge of the archaeological record and human past by means of geological, geophysical and other techniques. The interaction between geosciences and archaeology is particularly useful to understand the evolution and changes of land and coastal landscapes, studying the correlation between past human evidence with geology. Identification and analysis of archaeological sites using geophysical and remote sensing techniques, GIS methods and spatial interpretation of geoarchaeological evidence, human-environment interactions, identification of ancient raw material sources and technologies are other main geoarchaeological topics and find their natural place in this session. The goal of the session is to promote and stimulate discussions among all researchers and professionals with different backgrounds involved in cultural heritage studies.


P30. Geo-heritage, geoparks, geo-itineraries
Conveners: Piero Gianolla [University of Ferrara], Cristina Giovagnoli [ISPRA], Matevž Novak [Geological Survey of Slovenia], Alfio Vigano' [Servizio Geologico – Trento]
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In the knowledge-based society, awareness of the importance of geological heritage is constantly rising. Besides its long acknowledged geoscientific value, its socio-economic potential as an unexploited asset in tourism and geoscience education is recognized more and more. It is gaining an important role in filling great gaps in formal geological education that elementary and secondary schools curricula nowadays fail to provide. New digital technologies are offering almost unimaginable possibilities to the ways of geoheritage interpretation and presentation that can especially contribute to enrichment and attractiveness of museum collections.
Best practices in cross-disciplinary approach to promote geoheritage are established geoparks, geosites and geotrails. They link all geoscientific aspects (geological evolution and setting, hydrogeology, mineral deposits, geohazards, etc.) and closely relate them with regional cultural, gastronomic and intangible heritage. Presentations of city’s urban geology with the stone-built cultural monuments and pavements is another good practice in geo-education and geo-tourism.
Contributions covering all mentioned or related topics are welcome.


P31. Geology, food and health
Conveners: Giancarlo Ciotoli [CNR IGAG], Carlo Ferretti [Geo Identity Research (GIR)], Mariano Mercurio [University of Sannio]
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This session involves together geoscientists, medical and public health researchers to address health problems caused or exacerbated by geological materials (i.e. rocks, minerals, and water) and geologic processes (i.e., volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and dust) that contains naturally occurring elements. Many of these elements, present in the human body and taken in via food, water and air, are essential to animal and human, but other elements can also cause serious diseases for human health. In this frame, contributions that will deal with Radon issues will be expected. Moreover, the session will focus on various important disciplines of Geology, recent Geological Evolution of the Territory, Geo-pedology, Soil Science, and those Geo-Environmental items that have a direct connection with Agriculture, Food Products (e.g. wine, oil, fruit, vegetables, milk and dairy products), Food Science, Farming, Plant and Human Health. The theme will also cover scientific researches, instruments, methodologies and technical advances in the field of Geology, Hydrology, Agronomy, Agricultural and Earth Science, Climate and Microclimate, Epidemiology, GIS and GSA Geospatial analysis. The session provides a premier scientific and technical forum for expressing and learning about the advanced research and developments, as well as for new applications, technologies and to explore new trends in the field of Geology, food and health.


P32. Geo-data science
Conveners: Michele Pipan [University of Trieste],  Luca Bortolussi [University of Trieste], Nicola Bienati [ENI]
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Recent advancements in data analytics and Artificial Intelligence (AI), with specific reference to Machine Learning and Deep Learning, offer unique opportunities in the analysis, processing, inversion and interpretaJon of the huge data volumes generated in all Earth Sciences sectors, from remote sensing to geophysical, geochemical and geological studies. Correlations among data from different sources and predictions based on joint analysis and inversion of large amounts of data may enable a deep understanding of solid Earth, from the deep interior to the surface, from structure and physical properJes to deep and shallow processes, at a level of accuracy unavainable by classical methods. This session will focus on theory, methods, applicaJons and case studies that may highlight advantages and limitations of this rapidly growing field and promote discussion about the future of data science and scientific computing applied to Earth Sciences. We invite contributions from all of the sectors and at any scale (from micro to planetary), to share experiences and explore the routes of innovaJon that the new data analytics tools may open in Geoscience.


P33. Petrological and numerical tools to unravel the dynamics of Earth’s interior
Conveners: Luca Ziberna [University of Trieste], Manuele Faccenda [University of Padova],  Simone Tumiati [University of Milano]
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Heat and mass transfer in the deep Earth’s interior depends on the physical and chemical properties of its constituent minerals and fluids and is controlled by processes extending from the scale of atoms to tectonic plates. Important steps in understanding such processes are the chemical and physical characterization of the few available natural samples (xenoliths, exposed crust or mantle sections) and quantifying chemical reactions and phase relations in geological systems at high pressures and temperatures through both theoretical and laboratory experiments. These studies need then to be integrated with the results of geophysical investigations and the information retrieved from geological surface observations. Powerful tools to integrate such data are high-resolution numerical and thermodynamic simulations, which are able to model complex geodynamic processes like lithospheric thickening, rifting, subduction and mantle upwelling. This session will bring together studies from all of these perspectives,  which aim to unravel the dynamics of the deep inaccessible Earth. Contributions are sought from all relevant studies involving processes in the deep crust and mantle, from laboratory experiments, numerical, thermodynamic and geophysical modelling, geochemistry, mineralogy and mineral physics.


P34. Geosciences at school 2021
Conveners: Elena Bonaccorsi, Francesca Cifelli, Claudia Lupi, Eleonora Paris, Manuela Pelfini
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The session is an opportunity for discussion among school and university teachers in order to improve the geoscience skills of the next generation of citizens. New approaches and methods for education in Geosciences will be presented and discussed, including ICT practices in place for secondary and higher education, with particular emphasis on innovative experiences of distance education. Contributions related to learning sequences and activities in Earth science topics, international experiences, research in geoscience education, and collaborative experiences between schools, universities, natural history museums, and science centers are welcome.  The session will also be an opportunity to present and discuss experiences and results of the national geoscience program PLS (Scientific Degrees Project), as well as best practices in teacher education in Earth Sciences. Teachers of all school grades and researchers are invited to participate and contribute with their projects and activities, with the aim of spreading the culture of Earth Sciences in schools and society.
 
Per i docenti di scienze delle scuole di ogni ordine e grado, l'iscrizione alla sessione è GRATUITA. La sessione si svolgerà il 16 settembre.
L'evento è inserito anche sul portale SOFIA con il codice 87867. Gli iscritti riceveranno il relativo attestato di partecipazione.

P35. Open Poster Session
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